And Sew

Sometimes I know what to do, because I did it wrong the first time or two I tried.

I’m making a quilt for my newly expected grandchild. This time around, after trying to bind a practice quilt (for my granddaughter’s stuffed toys), I decided not to go the route of trial and error. Instead I took some great advice to go on You Tube and watch a video. Shazam! What a great resource.

I also took out the book that came with my sewing machine (I bought it used thirty years ago) and did a little pre-emptive studying to find out what all the dials and settings on the machine are for. It is amazing what the old gal (my machine’s name is Honey) will do.

This all reminds me of when my kids were in shop class in high school. The nice young instructor was letting the kids experiment with whatever method they wanted to try to accomplish a woodworking task. I questioned that practice. I thought he should teach them the right way to do it – from the start – and then when they get older (less memory) and actually want to build something, perhaps they won’t waste time and effort trying to recall which method was the one that actually worked. Just a thought.

Nowadays, there is so much for students to learn and so little time. I took a math class in college, where the less than stellar professor wasted three weeks trying to teach us the old method of derivatives, and then finally showed us the short cut. We were so confused by the final exam, we all flunked and he had to grade on a tremendous curve. I got 65% right and that gave me an A. Really?

Trial and error is a great teacher in many cases, and the only way many new things are discovered. I’ve found, however, the older I get, the less room there is for clutter in my brain. I no longer have to put my hand on the stove to see if it’s hot. I’ll take your word for it.

And so it sews…

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About Barbara K Tyner

A graduate of UCCS with a degree in English Lit., Barbara writes Children's Literature and fiction. Her popular children's series, The Badger Books, is co-authored with Barbara's daughter, Laura. Her first novel, "Wait Here, Wait There" deals with grief and Alzheimer's, two topics that are very difficult to manage in real life. Barbara volunteers doing school programs and speaking to support groups. National Parks, hiking, and snow-shoeing are in her list of favorite hobbies.
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