The Price We Pay

This morning, I walked with a friend on a ranch in NE Black Forest. Much of it was burned in this past summer’s fire.  The August and September rains spurred the growth of beautiful lush grass and at times I forgot I was walking in a burn area. As we meandered through the meadows and the woods, a hawk circled high above us, looking for breakfast. Elk, deer, fox, birds, bears and squirrels have all returned to reclaim their homes.

Fire is a natural process and easier for the animals to get over, I believe, because they don’t carry the baggage of stuff. The stuff we collect, our memories, our association between them and good times or the people who gave them to us all hamper our moving on to the next phase of our lives. I don’t know if animals grieve, but I know humans have a much harder time getting over devastation than the animals do. I guess we think too much; it’s the price we pay.

So, will the Washington politicians pull their heads out before they inflict enough damage to affect the entire world? I am reading a biography on Thomas Jefferson and I have to say, politics has always been ugly business but this is really low. Maybe it was better when politicians didn’t have the lens of today’s media to work under. The love of power, or the game of winning at any cost, is the repulsive incentive that brings a lot of people into politics. Most who want to help make things better simply get eaten alive.

I have to note that the best laugh I had this past week came when I saw a Congressman interviewed for TV and he whined about having to launder his own towels after using the Congressional gym. Shucks. After all, they pay a fee to have that done! My, my, I guess he doesn’t realize we all pay a ‘fee’ (called his salary) to send them to Washington to run the government and it isn’t getting done. Connect the dots, Congressman.

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About Barbara K Tyner

A graduate of UCCS with a degree in English Lit., Barbara writes Children's Literature and fiction. Her popular children's series, The Badger Books, is co-authored with Barbara's daughter, Laura. Her first novel, "Wait Here, Wait There" deals with grief and Alzheimer's, two topics that are very difficult to manage in real life. Barbara volunteers doing school programs and speaking to support groups. National Parks, hiking, and snow-shoeing are in her list of favorite hobbies.
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